WEEK 27: Getting ready to breathe
You’re now in your third trimester. Such an important week as your baby develops all that they need to breathe. Learn more about how they’re growing.
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27 weeks pregnant: Pregnancy tips and nutrition

In Pregnancy

    3-minutes read

    At a glance

    Your little one is now not so little – about 34cm long
     

    If reflux and heartburn is interrupting your sleep, add an extra pillow

     

    Avoid going to bed on a full stomach by keeping your evening meals light

    Antenatal classes are helpful, even for experienced parents

    Baby should be about 34 cm long now, so just a bit bigger than a ruler, with the head about the size of a small orange.

    Baby's development at 27 weeks

    Your little one isn’t so little anymore! Baby still has some growing to do, but should now be big enough to lie on your forearm, between your hand and your elbow.

    The respiratory system has all the parts it needs to start breathing, but it’s not ready just yet. The air sacs need to develop a bit more, and there won’t be enough surfactant (a substance that helps air move into the cells of the lungs to aid breathing) until week 35. So relax while your baby grows a little more.

    Your body

    Have you been trying to picture how big your little one is? Baby should be about 34 cm long now, so just a bit bigger than a ruler, with the head about the size of a small orange.

    We bet your baby is looking just lovely!

    Nutrition

    Heartburn can occur because baby’s weight is pushing on your stomach and intestines. This pressure can cause stomach acids to be squeezed into your oesophagus, relaxing the muscle at the top, creating that uncomfortable burning sensation.

    Having a hard time sleeping? Don’t worry; you’re not alone. Unfortunately, it’s quite normal at this stage of your pregnancy. But there are a few things you can try to help.

    If reflux and heartburn is interrupting your sleep, add an extra pillow so you’re sleeping almost upright. Alternatively, have a light evening meal so you’re not going to bed on a full stomach. If you get hungry later on, try some yoghurt and a piece of non-acidic fruit or a slice of whole grain bread with jam. Speak to your GP if changing your diet doesn’t help.

    Pregnancy tips

    Antenatal classes are helpful, even for experienced mums. That’s because researchers are constantly discovering new things that can help your pregnancy, and delivery methods change a lot too.

    They’ll help you understand what’s happening inside your body during labour and delivery, inform you about pain relief and hospital options, as well as teaching you some good relaxation techniques for when the time comes.

    For more information about antenatal classes, speak to your midwife.

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    Important advice to mothers

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life. SMA® Nutrition fully supports this and continued breastfeeding, along with the introduction of complementary foods as advised by your healthcare professional.